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Robina QLD

Australia

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Coronavirus COVID-19 - What are the Facts?

In doing my part for public health, it is important to know the facts rather than getting carried away with media reports.


Firstly, get the most up-to-date facts from the leading authority:

The World Health Organization (WHO)

They have the current number of people infected around the world by country; details on how to carry out simple hygiene prevention and what to do if you suspect you are infected.




Here are some useful WHO website links:

  1. WHO Coronavirus main page: https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019

  2. WHO Coronavirus Advice for Public: https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/advice-for-public

  3. WHO Coronavirus FAQ: https://www.who.int/news-room/q-a-detail/q-a-coronaviruses



Below is a short video from the WHO which explains how to protect yourself against the virus. One addition I will make to the video - it's been found that the virus can survive on surfaces up to 9 days.




Below are some useful facts about COVID19:


Transmission is by respiratory droplets

This means sneezing, coughing and close contact can spread the infection.

Note that respiratory droplets are generally heavy so they are more likely to land on surfaces, when keeping a distance of 1 metre away from the person coughing or sneezing.


Incubation period is 2-10 days

This is the time between exposure to the infection and appearance of first symptoms. The average (from what I have read) seems to be about 5 days. To put this in perspective, the common cold is approx. 3 days and influenza is approx. 2-3 days.


Common Symptoms

Fever, fatigue, dry cough, myalgia (muscle soreness) and dyspnoea (difficult or laboured breathing). Respiratory and lung issues are common.


Who is most at risk

Complications are more common in the elderly and those with comorbidities (coexisting disease such as hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and malignancy).


Simple hygiene practices are the most important for prevention.

These are: hand washing, coughing into your elbow, disposing of used tissues immediately into a closed bin, disinfecting surfaces that potentially have been exposed, and keeping at a distance of 1 metre from anyone infected or coughing.






This was a really quick fact check - please visit the WHO website for any further information.

All photos and videos used are from the WHO website.


Stay well everyone!